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Lisbon, also known as “Lisboa,” stands as the beating heart of Portugal, encompassing both its capital and cultural-economic hub. Nestled along the shores of the golden Atlantic, the city captivates with a blend of old-world charm and modern vibrancy. The juxtaposition of the ancient and the contemporary renders Lisbon one of Europe’s enchanting cities. When embarking on a journey to Portugal, including a visit to Lisbon is a must. The city promises a sensory-rich experience, boasting breathtaking vistas, picturesque beaches, unique neighborhoods, rich architecture, historical landmarks, diverse museums, lively entertainment venues, and exquisite culinary delights.

Here are some of the most recommended places to visit:

In the Belem quarter, situated to the west of Lisbon near the Tagus River, several historical and architectural landmarks define the city’s identity:

1. Jeronimos Monastery: A remarkable 16th-century structure, characterized by its unique architecture. Recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage site, Jeronimos Monastery served as a place of prayer for sailors before their voyages due to its proximity to the Tagus River.

2. Belem Tower: Adjacent to Jeronimos Monastery and on the bank of the Tagus River stands the impressive Belem Tower, adorned with maritime motifs. Built in the 16th century, the tower served as a maritime entrance gate to Lisbon, a mooring point for the Portuguese fleet, and part of the city’s river defense system.

3. Monument to the Discoveries: The white monument on the riverbank is one of Lisbon’s most impressive structures. Atop the monument are statues revealing figures such as Vasco da Gama. An elevator takes visitors to the top for panoramic views of Lisbon and the river.

Exploring Belem is incomplete without indulging in the mythological pastry, Pastéis de Belem, from the iconic bakery established in 1837. Don’t miss the traditional Nata pastry, vanilla cream tart with sugar and cinnamon, made from a secret recipe.

Alfama: A walking tour through Alfama reveals the picturesque streets of Lisbon’s oldest quarter, which miraculously survived the earthquake and tsunami of 1755. In this historic area, you’ll also find traces of the Jewish community’s former residence. Modern cafes and clubs now dot the ancient streets, offering a chance to witness traditional Fado music performances.

Sao Jorge Castle: Close to Alfama, on the highest point in Lisbon, sits the city’s oldest castle. The fortress, surrounded by walls and towers, served as a royal palace and later as a prison. The breathtaking view from the castle’s summit awaits those who ascend.

Baixa and Rossio Square: Lisbon’s central square, Rossio, is surrounded by government buildings and the stock exchange, with a statue of King Jose I at its center. For a beautiful panorama of the city, visitors can ascend to the terrace of the stunning Victoria Gate.

Augusta Street: The main and vibrant thoroughfare of Lisbon, Augusta Street, unfolds for visitors leaving through the Victoria Gate. Lined with shops, cafes, and restaurants, some buildings feature colorful ceramic tiles.

Gulbenkian Museum: Lisbon boasts numerous museums, both large and small. The Gulbenkian Museum is worth a visit not only for its splendid art collection but also for its impressive architecture and well-maintained gardens. Other recommended museums include the Tile Museum (Museu do Azulejo), located in a monastery, showcasing the history and production of ceramic tiles, and the Maritime Museum, illustrating Portugal’s maritime history and major discoveries.

Bairro Alto: Nestled on the hilly slopes, Bairro Alto is an artistic and trendy district offering countless entertainment options day and night. During the day, enjoy the picturesque streets and unique architecture, along with galleries and boutiques. In the evening, Bairro Alto transforms with a variety of clubs, restaurants, cafes, and bars.

Lisbon, with its rich history, diverse neighborhoods, and cultural treasures, promises a sensory and enriching experience for every traveler.